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Black Walnut Riches

Wild food forager Paul Tappenden describes the ways he makes the most of this sure sign of autumn.

Every fall, beginning in mid-September, I gather the black walnuts that litter the ground like green and black tennis balls all around our neighborhood. I try to gather the green ones, as they are less likely to contain the ubiquitous husk maggots. I remove the husks (usually by rolling them underfoot until the husks split) and put the nuts on a tray to dry them out, either in a low oven or in my dehydrator. After the initial drying I leave them sitting on a wire rack, to cure for about six weeks. Around Thanksgiving time they are ready to use.

To make use of the husks, I put them into a large bucket and pour on hot water. After a while, the water turns a deep, blackish brown. I pour it through a strainer into a second bucket, then use it to dye clothes or to stain wood. It makes the best tie dye effects.

Once the nuts have cured, I begin using them in my recipes. If I need nuts in my pastries, I’ll use either hickory nuts or black walnuts (or both), secure in the thought that they are fresh and haven’t been irradiated, like so many commercial nuts. Besides, black walnuts taste great!

The most challenging part is opening these tough shelled nuts. I use a strong knife and a hammer to split them in two, and then some snippers to remove the remaining shells (see below).

I encourage you to explore the many uses of one of nature’s many autumnal gifts.

Sheep and Wool Festival, and Camp tours, too!

Sheep and Wool Festival!

When: Sunday, May 28th from 10 am to 4 pm.

Where: 285 Hungry Hollow Road, Chestnut Ridge NY 10977

The Fiber Craft Studio hosts their 7th annual, family-friendly Sheep and Wool Festival! Visitors can engage in hands-on carding, spinning, weaving, felting, knitting and plant dyeing. Featuring fuzzy, approachable sheep, goats, and bunnies; craft vendors and artisans selling natural fiber items; a silent auction; puppet shows; and delicious food! Plant-dyed yarns, fibers, craft kits and clothing patterns produced by the Studio will be sold at the Festival.

Admission is free. A small fee will be charged for the activities. All proceeds from the Festival will benefit the Fiber Craft Studio.

Camp Tours, too!

If you are considering camp for this summer, but have not made it to one of our Open Houses, join us for one of two camp tours at 10:00 am or 12:00 pm on Sunday the 28th. Tours will leave from the Sheep and Wool Festival and will answer all of your burning questions about camp!

We will also be hosting our final Open House of the season on Saturday, June 3rd at 1:00 pm. If you would like to join us, please RSVP to camp@thenatureplace.com. We will meet at the Lower School Building of the Green Meadow Waldorf School–307 Hungry Hollow Road, Chestnut Ridge NY. Hope to see you there!