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Ed’s Corner

Originally published on March, 20 2018

Well…it’s here! Happy First Official Day of Spring! Here’s a poem by Harriet Prescott Spofford that I always enjoy rustling out of my collection around this time of year. She writes:

“Under the snow drifts
the blossoms are sleeping
Dreaming their dreams of sunshine and June.
Down in the hush of their quiet they’re keeping
trills from the throstle’s wild summer-sung tune.”

Isn’t it perfect for this time of year? I like to think of myself as one of those blossoms. I often find myself daydreaming of sunshine and June and, of course, the start of camp, as the clocks change and daylight hours stretch longer and longer, but that spring-time warmth is still elusive. I keep the summer-song of the thrushes (did you know that ‘throstle’ is an old-fashioned word for a song thrush) close to my heart and as summer gets closer, I look for the early signs that it is near.

On top of dreaming about summer, our year-round crew has been busy preparing for it; excitedly working to bring our 33rd Nature Place summer to you. This week, we’re down at the American Camp Association’s Tri-State Camp Conference in Atlantic City–the largest gathering of camp professionals in the world!–where we’ll take workshops, expand our horizons, and spend time with other camp folks dedicated to spreading the joy of the camp experience.

If our excitement for summer was enough to melt the snow drifts and awaken the sleeping blossoms, Spring would have sprung long ago.

Ed’s Corner

The Fifth Season

Well, we all know we have winter, spring, summer and fall, but did you know there
is a fifth season? It’s Sugaring Time. Coming right between winter and spring, it can last for 2 weeks or close to two months.

It’s all dependent on the weather. Cold nights and warmer days are what’s needed for the buckets on our maple trees to fill with the clear, sweet liquid we call ‘sap’. We then boil the sap until it turns into that amber aristocrat of all sweets – maple syrup!

I hope you can make one of the two maple sugaring programs we will be offering this Saturday, February 24th. The purpose of the program is to give you enough information to identify a maple tree, show you how to ‘tap’ it, how to collect the sap, and how to boil it down to maple syrup. Each family will take home a sheet of instructions and your very own spout.

Sugaring is a great family activity – everyone can get involved in some way and the syrup you’ll make will be the best syrup you’ve ever tasted in your life!

Looking forward to seeing you as we celebrate our fifth season.

Ed’s Corner

When it’s a nasty, cold, winter-mix kind of day, and it seems that its been gray forever, just think about that the fact that the sun is still shining very brightly right above the clouds, just as it does on the sunniest day. And if you’re feeling a little grey like the day, remember that somewhere there is light, above the clouds, throwing shadows against the earth. If you find yourself within your own shadow, look for the light – it is there. The bigger the shadow, the larger the light.

 

Ed’s Corner

This is the time of year where we have the shortest daylight. It’s gray. It’s rainy. There’s not enough snow yet to make it feel brighter, prettier, seasonal. Some people experience a condition called SAD – Seasonal Affective Disorder – in the winter months, due to a lack of light. Special lamps are sold for people to sit under each day, which mimic the sun’s light. Reports lead me to believe they work!

This year, there are other reasons to be sad besides SAD. The news provides us with plenty of fodder to feel down, full of angst, stressed out, wondering what might be the truth…

But have hope! There is truth and tranquility to be be found when you are out in nature. And wherever you are, nature is not very far from you. Natural winter delights and verities are all around us:

* A beautiful snowstorm that transforms the sharp corners of the world
* If you tap trees, it’s time to get ready for maple sugaring
* By mid-January, you will feel – some days – a warmth in the air. The quality of the daylight will begin to feel different
* The sun rises in the morning and sets at night. This seems trivial but did you ever think about how it happens each and every day, without fail, and we can depend on it?
* How wonderful a fire feels and smells on a cold day

You can find your own truths out of doors. Forget the news for a while. It’s time for a nature break.

Ed’s Corner

Walking recently in the crisp Fall air, with multi-colored leaves crunching underfoot, I was struck, as I often am, by the undeniable truth that surrounds us in nature. As I walked, the lyrics of Malvina Reynold’s 1964 folk song, “God Bless the Grass”, came slowly out of the recesses of my memory. I thought I’d share them with you here:

God Bless the Grass

God bless the grass that grows thru the crack.
They roll the concrete over it to try and keep it back.
The concrete gets tired of what it has to do,
It breaks and it buckles and the grass grows thru,
And God bless the grass.

God bless the truth that fights toward the sun,
They roll the lies over it and think that it is done.
It moves through the ground and reaches for the air,
And after a while it is growing everywhere,
And God bless the grass.

God bless the grass that grows through cement.
It’s green and it’s tender and it’s easily bent.
But after a while it lifts up its head,
For the grass is living and the stone is dead,
And God bless the grass.

God bless the grass that’s gentle and low,
Its roots they are deep and its will is to grow.
And God bless the truth, the friend of the poor,
And the wild grass growing at the poor man’s door,
And God bless the grass.

Ed’s Corner

It’s About Time

We think we can manipulate time, twist it like a Gumby, do whatever with it.
For example, we say we can save it, spend it. But I don’t know of a time bank where you get time interest from the time you put into it.

You can have a great time, a terrible time; we believe we can even make time; take time out; be on time; waste time; lose time; run out of it; squeeze time.

To me, time is:

now….now….now….now….now….now…. You get the idea. We live only in this moment, this now.

Good news!

There are a lot of moments in front of you. You are blessed with many possibilities and choices of how you want to be or what you want to do in the next many moments. Yes, the choice is yours: what will you make of the most precious thing you have?

This month of October is glorious in so many ways. I hope you will choose to “spend” your time with your children out-of-doors.

Ed’s Corner

To those of you who are reading our blog for the first time, welcome! To those who are long-time readers, it’s good to have you back. Each year, when I am called to prepare my contribution for September’s issue of The Dirt and its corresponding blog post, it is a tell-tale sign for me that summer is over, and it is time once again to enter the magical and transformational season called ‘fall’.

As many of us know, beyond our personal, unofficial signs of fall’s arrival, there is in fact an official beginning to the season. This year, the autumnal equinox occurs on Friday, September 22nd at precisely 4:02 PM, when the sun crosses the celestial equator. On this day we will have equal parts night and day. From then on, nights will slowly become longer than days, until we arrive at the shortest day of the year, the winter solstice in December. From there we begin the slow lengthening of our days as the cycle through the seasons continues.

With the thought of this cyclical, circular motion in mind, I’d like to share with you a poem I wrote following our last day of camp, just a bit over a month ago. Though the season has begun to turn, the memory of that day is still just as fresh in my mind as if it happened yesterday. It is one that I will hold dear as we enjoy each changing season, until we arrive at glorious summer once again.

 

Love Is All Aground

On the big field, on the last day of camp,
without fail, we take time for goodbyes.
Holding hands, we form one large circle
that this year held one final surprise.

With all of our campers and counselors
each holding the hands of two others,
no matter how many, how far afield,
we always find room for each other.

Once our living circle has formed,
the center we share gives us reason
to recall all the circles we have in our lives:
the earth, the moon…the seasons.

We may feel a little bit melancholy,
knowing this summer’s camp is now done,
but we take solace in the circle of time:
we’ll be back, under next summer’s sun.

As we stood hand in hand, I became aware,
my eyes tracing our ring, start to start:
though our ‘circle’ may not have been perfect,
it did form one great, perfect HEART.

The tipis that still dominated the field
had sent us a little astray,
enough to dimple our circle of souls
in this wondrously suitable way.

I was called to the middle to share
some meaningful, well chosen words.
I had them scripted, but this surprise heart
had rendered them moot and absurd.

All I really needed to do
was point out the heart we had made,
shaped by our own hearts and hands
though we hadn’t known what was at play.

Love and tears suffused the air,
the oohs, the ahhs were all profound.
We’ve always known our camp is Love —
here the proof stood on the ground.

 

 

Ed’s Corner

Ralph Waldo Emerson describes (though unintentionally) what many of us, regardless of our age, feel when at camp and in the outdoors:

“Crossing a bare common, in snow puddles, at twilight, under a clouded sky, without having in my thoughts any occurrence of special good fortune, I have enjoyed a perfect exhilaration. I am glad to the brink of fear. In the woods too, a man casts off his years, as the snake his slough, and at what period soever of life, is always a child. In the woods, is perpetual youth.”

Camp is just around the corner. The warm summer season to come makes it easy to ‘cast off our years’ and step outside. Fair, sunny days, thick afternoon thunderstorms, tall grass, blooming flowers, all of nature very much alive, gives us every excuse to drop what we’re ‘supposed to be doing’ and spend time just ‘being’ outdoors. Whether you have children at camp, or if your children now have children of their own, you too can be like a child again, outside in the green and growing world.

Ed’s Corner

Welcome to Dr. Ed’s Office.

Now, what are your symptoms again? Hard to stay still for a long period of time; feel like you’re missing out on something; you have some kind of notion that the sky is singing and is blue just for you; the scents unexpectedly brought to you on a gentle, warm breeze stop you in your tracks and you think that you have never smelled anything better in your life; you realize how ‘in the moment’ you are; it’s hard to focus on daily routines; you wonder why you haven’t noticed before how beautiful sunsets can be; you find yourself smiling for no apparent reason; you even smile at strangers; you slow down; you sing or hum to yourself Louis Armstrong’s song, “What a Wonderful World”.

I think I’ve heard enough. You’ve got the bug alright. You are not alone. Millions of others succumb every year at this time. Yes, it’s that old Spring Fever.

Now real fevers – like you may get in the winter – are usually treated in one or two ways. Some people, at the very first sign of a fever, run to the drugstore and buy whatever they can to chase that fever away, get rid of it at all costs, stop it in its tracks, take whatever drugs they have to.

Others will accept their fevers as a natural way for the body to deal with whatever bug, virus, bacteria or dis-ease is in their bodies. No drugs necessary here.

Being that I’m the kind of Doctor from the old school, I believe that fevers develop for a reason – a way for the body to heal itself.

So, my prescription for all of you with Spring Fever: get out! Into nature. The fever is calling you to partake in the growth and the blossoming of Spring and to rejuvenate your body and spirit. Go out and breathe, touch, smell, listen to, and lay down on the earth. Reconnect. Give in to the fever.

springfever

Ed’s Corner

The temperatures and weather of late have been all over the place: rain, fog, snow, 70 degrees, 15 degrees, ice. The expression, ‘if you don’t like the weather today, wait until tomorrow’, has never seemed more true.

The following is from an ancient book of secret nature lore (o-o-ah-ah), but we thought we would share it with you now, to help you keep track of the weather. This weather tracker will, as its name implies, track the weather in the moment – not 3 days from now, not last week – but in the present moment. There will be no screens, dials, or buttons.

Obtain a stick or twig (there are many on the ground now after some of the fierce March winds) about 6-8 inches long. Get a piece of string about 10-12 inches long. Tie one end of the string around the stick at the very center of the stick, so that when you hold the loose end of the string, the stick balances horizontally.

Find a place outdoors from which you can hang your weather tracker. Hanging it from a branch might be good. Make sure your tracker is not under an overhang, i.e. where your roof extends over. It should be as exposed as possible to the elements. Try to find such a spot near a window so that you can look out and observe it directly.

Weather Tracker

The following chart is essential:

If the stick is moving – it’s windy
If you can’t see the stick – it might be foggy or night time
If it’s wet – it’s raining
If it’s white – it’s snowing
If it is in bright light – it is sunny

You may add to this chart as you get to know your weather tracker and your microclimate a little better.

So, with tongue in cheek, I wish you happy tracking.

(I do wish you were able to receive this esoteric nature knowledge on April 1)