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Medicinal, Magnificent Mugwort

Wild food forager Paul Tappenden suggests the manifold manifestations of Mugworts medicinal magic!

After a day of heavy work, I was awoken several times throughout the night with leg cramps. Ordinarily, when I suffer from muscle cramps or pains, rubbing a Mugwort salve that I keep next to my bedside into the offending area generally puts a stop to the problem. However, when my body is particularly stressed, as on this particular night, it requires a more heavy-duty approach. At times like that, I may make a large pot of Mugwort tea, pour it into a hot bath, and luxuriate in the relaxing, aromatic liquid.

Another approach is to make some Mugwort tea and simply drink it. This is what I did throughout the day following the bad cramping. That night, I didn’t have a single problem with cramps and, as a bonus, I had very clear dreams. As well as being high in magnesium, Mugwort is calming and relaxing and kills intestinal parasites.

Mugwort has been considered a sacred herb by many over the centuries. In addition to the properties I’ve already mentioned, it can be used as a smudging herb, which when burnt, can kill 98 percent of airborne bacteria.

So, the next time you’re pulling that pesky Mugwort out of your yard or community garden, stop to consider the powers it possesses. You just might have a cure you’ve been searching for right in your hands.

Winter Snake

Chuck Stead, our beloved camp storyteller, tells us a mysterious tale of an unexpected winter discovery…

It was cold, cold, cold, and it was dry. It hadn’t snowed in three weeks. We could deal with the cold when there was snow, but without it, the ground was frozen hard and everywhere you stepped felt like you walked on jagged rock. The temperature hung around twenty degrees by day and colder by night. The animals don’t move much when the cold sets in like this; they conserve their energy. The fish drop low in the water and the ice fishermen don’t stay long when the winter wind picks up. So, the last thing you expect to see in these conditions is a snake.

Usually by November 1st, snakes go in under the rocks and don’t come out until after April 1st. Sometimes, if there is a mid-winter warm-up, a few snakes come out to look around and then rush back in under the rocks. Uncle Mal used to tell us, “No self-respected snake comes out in the winter time, because they are naked as a jay-bird.”

Ricky Cramshaw told him, “Uncle Mal, jay-birds ain’t naked—they are covered in feathers!”
Mal said to him, “That is not the point.”
Ricky said, “And jay-birds do come out in the winter!”
Mal said, “Ricky, it’s just a saying!”
“Yeah, and you is just saying it!”

Ricky and I were over at the Paint Shop because we found a frozen black snake down by the river and brought it to Uncle Mal. He stared down at the black snake that was frozen stiff in a neat straight line, like a piece of frozen rope. It was about two feet long, so Mal figured it was a young snake, as they can grow up to six feet or better. Mike, the shop dog, came along and sniffed the snake a few times, and then walked away. Mal rolled it over and we saw that it was white on the underside. He told us it was a Black Rat snake and that if it was black all around it was called a Black Racer.

Ricky said, “So why did it come out and freeze up like this?”
Mal said, “I don’t know. Sometimes they come out if it gets warm but it ain’t been warm in weeks.” He thought about this and then said, “And the thing is they don’t tend to hibernate under rocks by the river; no, they go up to the south side of the mountains where the rocks will keep them warm and dry.” He rolled it back over onto its belly so that its black side was now up again. He said, “No sir, this here snake did not get to the river on its own.”
I said, “What do you mean?”
“I mean, I figure that somebody tossed him down there.”
Ricky said, “Who would put a froze-up snake down by the river?”
Mal said, “Maybe someone found it somewhere else and thought it ought to be put down there?”

I wasn’t sure, but it kind of seemed like the frozen black snake wasn’t as straight as when we found it. I told Uncle Mal that, and he told us a story about one time in the late winter, when Uncle Dutchie found a big frozen Copper Head snake. He picked it up and walked along with it until it warmed up and came back to life!
Ricky said, “Hey, could this snake come back to life?”

Mal wasn’t sure, so he got out a five-gallon bucket and put the snake into it. When he picked it up I saw that it was no longer stiff as a stick, but more rope-y. We put the bucket near the hot air vent and sat by it, keeping an eye on the snake, as it slowly became more rubbery. Mal told us about how Native Americans believe that snakes come back to life all the time.

He started telling us ‘snake-come-back-to-life’ stories and we got to listening to the warm sound of his voice and to thinking about the people and the places in his stories. Then, all of a sudden, I heard a sound from inside the bucket. I jumped up and looked in, and there was the black snake, moving around in the bottom of the bucket! Mal got up and put a screen over the top and placed a hammer there to weigh down the screen. The black snake was now clearly wiggling around. It had come back to life!

Mal told us reptiles slow down and hibernate in the winter, but that if we hadn’t found the snake when we did, it would most likely have died. Ricky was thrilled and he named the snake ‘Blackie’. Mal told us it was not easy to take care of a black snake, especially in the winter time when they want to be asleep.
Ricky said, “He can sleep at my house!”

Mal didn’t agree. He made a few phone calls and then he drove us, with Blackie The Snake, up to the Bear Mountain Zoo, where they had a place to keep snakes in the winter time. There was this man there who knew all about snakes and he examined Blackie and said he was in good shape. He told us we had saved his life. We watched him put Blackie into a special indoor snake den where there were other black snakes sleeping under rocks. This man thanked us again and he walked us through the cold, over to the Bear Mountain Inn. He brought us hot chocolate at the Inn and then he and Mal talked about how long it had been this bitter cold. Then the man said, “You know, Mal, that snake could have only been out there a day or so.”

Mal said, “Yes sir, that’s what I figured.”
“So, somebody must have put him there.”
Mal said he figured that, too. Then both men got quiet and we finished our chocolate and Uncle Mal said, “Somebody is messing with the snakes.”

 

Ed’s Corner

When it’s a nasty, cold, winter-mix kind of day, and it seems that its been gray forever, just think about that the fact that the sun is still shining very brightly right above the clouds, just as it does on the sunniest day. And if you’re feeling a little grey like the day, remember that somewhere there is light, above the clouds, throwing shadows against the earth. If you find yourself within your own shadow, look for the light – it is there. The bigger the shadow, the larger the light.

 

Garbage Can Challenge – January Update

It is hard to believe we are four months into our challenge! I was elated last month to have met our family goal and a little sad to report we were a bit shy of our goal this month. I saw it coming, with the holidays, influx of gatherings, extra food preparation, gifts, etc. While I was trying to be as vigilant as possible, we still ended up producing a little over half our large trash can’s worth of garbage over the month. I have since regained my positive attitude though, and am fired up to make this month a good garbage count month!

In my last post, I left you with a few ideas I was going to try out. Firstly, ice cream. Holy cow (no pun intended) did it come out heavenly! I didn’t make it just once. No, I couldn’t stop! I made several batches of vanilla, a few chocolate with chocolate chips, and one that I used maple syrup in as the only sweetener, and added toasted pecans. I haven’t made any in a few weeks, but just writing about it makes me want to make some tonight! I highly encourage you to try it out if you can!

Additionally, and rightfully secondly, after all that ice cream, I started making my own toothpaste. This also was a huge success. It is so simple and even got kid approved. My niece Naima loves it and told me I needed to give the recipe to her mama. Here is the recipe I used*:

2 tablespoons organic coconut oil
1 tablespoon of baking soda
~20 drops of organic essential oil (I used peppermint oil)

Mix it together and you are all set! This toothpaste can be stored in a recycled jelly jar, or something similar.

*Recipe courtesy of Lauren Singer.

Click to see Daniel and Ayla’s homemade toothpaste debut!

I’ve also stocked up on some new cotton produce bags, bamboo toothbrushes and refillable dental floss. By the way, did you know that, “if everyone in the US flosses their teeth according to ADA recommendations, every single year, our empty containers alone would fill a landfill the size of a football field that 6 stories high!”? I found this out from Lauren Singer’s video on floss, (the low-waste alternative to traditional floss is unfortunately sold out at the time I’m writing this). Even these seemingly little things make a big difference, especially as more and more people catch on!

Amelia, a long time NPDC camper and counselor, wrote in on our blog with a fabulous suggestion I wanted to share:

“Here is a tip I cam across recently. When you go to a restaurant, bring containers for leftovers instead of using the one-time-use styrofoam boxes [or plastic containers]. I can’t stand those things! Apparently it is convention in many European countries for restaurants to not even provide doggy bags; you have to bring the container yourself if you want to take your food home!

Lets break the norm and get rid of non-biodegradable one time use containers!”

Thanks Amelia! A great idea indeed! What other ideas are you guys trying out? Let us all know by leaving a comment on the blog post here.

Signing off until next time,
Ayla

 

 

Cooking: Beyond Gender

Our cooking instructor, Eva Szigeti, talks about her own experience as a woman in the kitchen, and suggests ways that we can break down stereotypes by involving children in cooking, regardless of their gender…

I love to cook, but I am not always ready to admit to this. Although growing interest in quality food and the cooking experience itself is bringing more and more home cooks of both genders into the kitchen, the daily food preparation for a family is still often viewed as mostly a “women’s job”.  Women who embrace this activity are unfortunately still seen by some as ‘homely’, possibly not emancipated, or even not skilled to do anything else. I am often reluctant to talk about my hobby because of this negative stigma—a result of patriarchically established gender roles.

The notion of cooking as a gendered activity has been strongly present in our cultural tradition. Cooking was traditionally perceived as a woman’s mundane job—one that almost anyone can do—not as a true skill or craft, thus underscoring the subordinate position of women in society. Cooking, in the realm of the domestic life, was reserved for women, while food production outside of the sphere of private life belonged to men.  The bakers and butchers of patriarchal societies were always men. The low status of domestic kitchen work stood in sharp contrast to the much higher status of the work performed by these ‘skilled craftsmen,’ who were always men.

Recently, I stumbled upon a book called The Working Wives’ (Salaried or Otherwise) Cook Book by Theodora Zavin and Freda Stuart. The book was published in 1963. The primary assumption within is that the wife is the one who prepares the family dinner, even when holding a full-time job. As for husbands, we read the following: “The nonworking wife may be able to send her husband to the supermarket or give him the job of doing the dishes without repercussions.  But the working wife must, of necessity, always be aware that the mere fact of her working may to some degree impinge on her husband’s feeling of masculinity. She must be doubly cautious about not heaping ‘women’s work’ on him. We have the impression that most working wives are so sensitive to this that, whoever that beleaguered, emasculated, domesticated husband may be whom the magazines are always decrying, he is not the husband of the working wife.”

These lines sound amusing or sad today, depending on the perspective. No doubt, a lot has changed since The Sixties. Men not only venture to the supermarkets to do the weekly shopping, many men cook. Some of them share kitchen activities with their partners, and there certainly are families were the man is the primary presence in the kitchen. But, often, men interested in food and cooking don’t take on everyday cooking projects. Rather, they engage in occasional and distinctly ‘masculine’ activities, like making and smoking sausage or jerky, curing bacon, or cooking meats outdoors. With these, they are clearly not entering the world of ‘housewives’, but – one could say – they are embracing the ‘hunter’ within. These manifestations of traditional gender roles raise the question: how can we navigate the kitchen with our children of any gender, and how can we cultivate a love of cooking that continues to break down limitations and stigmas for future generations.

My first and only rule is to engage my children.  Chores and tasks should be assigned based on their age, interests, and personalities, rather than on gender. Children love hands-on activities. Most of them are happy to participate if they feel useful. If engaged in simple kitchen projects from an early age on, cooking becomes a “normal” part of a child’s repertoire of activities, a habit that won’t be question later in life.

I recommend not taking risks at first. Start with activities your kids will like for sure. A young child will love to wash salad greens, a variation on water play. Washing dishes might can be made into a fun activity for an older child. Working with bread dough is very much like playing with play dough. And mixing is always so much fun! Yes, it would be much faster and much less messy for us adults to complete these jobs, but we need to exercise patience and let them do the work. This is how our children learn. The cleanup time is our long-term investment in their lifelong habits and hobbies.

I like to think of kitchen as (among many other things) a place where children can learn how to collaborate, a place where we can strengthen family relationships, and even gently fight gender stereotypes.

Creamy Carrot Dressing

This is an easy recipe to make and a very impressive one as far as salad dressings go. Anyone can make this one. No cooking experience is needed, but you will need a blender.

Make sure to supervise your children while they use the blender.

This wholesome dressing works not only on salads, it can also be used as a dipping sauce for raw and steamed vegetables, or even served over meats.

1 inch fresh ginger
4 medium carrots
1 small onion
1 clove of garlic
2 cups canola oil (add up to ½ cup more oil for a less thick dressing)
½ cup apple cider vinegar
½ cup soy sauce
1 tablespoon miso
1 tablespoon ketchup
1 tablespoon lemon juice
black pepper to taste

Put all ingredients into a blender. Cream until smooth and creamy with no chunks.
This is a very large batch. Feel free to halve the recipe.

Upcoming Event: Winter Tales with Chuck Stead – January 13th

Every Friday at camp, master storyteller Chuck Stead spins funny, poignant, outrageous and true stories of his childhood and growing up in the nearby Ramapo Mountains. When the weather turns cold and winter has really set in, Chuck tells us his Winter Tales – stories that sparkle and glimmer like the snow and ice of January.

Join us for this free public program from Noon to 1 PM on January 13th at Green Meadow Waldorf School (307 Hungry Hollow Road, Chestnut Ridge NY 10977)! Open house afterward from 1 – 4 pm.

Dandelion Root Recipes

Wild food forager Paul Tappenden shares a few creative ways he loves to use dandelion root in regular cooking. You may be surprised at just how versatile this pervasive plant is.

I’ve found many different uses for Dandelions during my time as a forager. Each part of the plant, from the flower to the root, has several purposes—from wines, to dyes, to foods and medicines.

The root is unquestionably the most versatile part. I’ve often written about how I grind and roast the roots to make a tasty coffee substitute, but the same ground roots can also be used in other ways. A few years ago, I reconstituted some in a gravy, adding chopped onion, garlic and herbs, to create a substitute for minced beef. It worked so well, that I have made it several times since, refining my recipe each time.

I’ve used my fake chop meat in pasta sauces, chilis, stuffed peppers and pastry fillings. I’ve even combined it with egg and acorn flour to create faux meatballs. By adding other textures. like acorn grits, ground Maitaki mushrooms, or mashed lentils, the texture and flavor can be adjusted.

I find clean straight roots, I put them aside. Once I have a few, I take a potato peeler and cut the roots into long strips, which I dehydrate and reconstitute in a sauce. I then semi-dehydrate the flavored roots until they have a texture like jerky. Again, it took several tries to get it just right, but now it is an oft-requested munchy.

Another popular dish, is my wild, vegan version of Jamaican patties, using curried dandelion-root-filling in an acorn crust. Whenever I take some to an event, they disappear rapidly.  Not only are they tasty, but they are organic, non-GMO and full of nutrition.

Mistletoe

Chuck Stead, our beloved camp storyteller, tells a story of mistletoe missed connections and suprises…

We three kids (Cindy Maloney, Ricky Cramshaw, and myself) sat at the Soda Fountain counter, watching folks come in off the street. Just to the right of the door, a small branch of mistletoe, with its dark green leaves and translucent white berries, hung from the ceiling. We watched to see if anyone kissed under it. My uncle Mal told us that when you stood beneath the mistletoe, the next person to come along was obliged to kiss you. So far, no one stood beneath it. The girl behind the counter was new; we’d never seen her before. She brought us three mugs of hot cocoa and a little plate with three marshmallows on it. We stared at the plate and figured she’d never served cocoa before. She saw us staring at the plate of marshmallows and she said, “They’re marshmallows.”

Ricky said, “Yup, we know that.”
“They’re for your cocoa.”
“Yup, we know that too.”
She said, “Don’t you like marshmallows?”
I said, “Yeah, we like them in our cocoa.”
Ricky said, “But they look silly on a plate.”
Cindy took one of them and dropped it into her mug of cocoa. She said, “We never got them on a plate before.”
The girl said, “Oh. Well, I am new here. My name is Trudy.”
We told her our names and Ricky said, “Trudy, did you hang the mistletoe?”
She said she had hung it.
He said, “Well, it ain’t working. No one goes under it and no kissing happens.”

When he said the word ‘kissing’, he spread it out and made it sound like “Keeeeeey-sing”. Trudy smiled, and I saw that she had dimples in both of her cheeks.

She said, “Well, should we hang it someplace else?”

We all looked around at different places. I thought it could go over the entrance, but that could be a problem for people getting in and out, while kissing-people stood in their way. Ricky suggested over the bathroom door, but then we agreed that it might be smelly there. Cindy suggested a place in front of the juke-box. Trudy went over and got a short step-ladder, took down the mistletoe from where it was, and hung it over the top of the juke box. She put it just a bit in front of the jukebox so folks could get caught standing beneath it. She put the little step ladder away and went down the counter to take a man’s order. We kids took our mugs of cocoa and sat in a booth near the juke box. Still no one walked beneath it.

After a while, Cindy said, “My mom says mistletoe is poisonous.”
I said, “Yup, my mom said you need to be careful about getting kissed by the wrong person under it.”
Cindy said, “How can you tell who the wrong person is?”
“I don’t know. I guess you find out later.”
Ricky said, “Then how can you be careful?”
“I guess you just don’t go under it.”

We finished our cocoa and still no ‘persons’, wrong or right, went under the mistletoe. Finally, Trudy came back to us and said, “Any luck?” We shook our heads.

She stared up at the mistletoe and said that maybe we needed to move it again. She looked at Ricky and said, “Come on little man, help me take it down.”
Ricky slid out of the booth and Trudy brought the step ladder over to the juke-box. She then hefted Ricky up in her arms and she stepped onto the ladder. Ricky stretched his arms upward to the mistletoe overhead. Trudy looked at him and said, “Oh my, we’re under the mistletoe!” He looked at her, mortified, but it was too late, and she kissed his cheek. Cindy and I howled and laughed and shoved each other around. Trudy put Ricky down and he charged directly to the bathroom, where he scrubbed her red lipstick from his cheek. When he came out of the bathroom his face was beet red and he was sporting an over-exaggerated frown.

Trudy came to our table with three more mugs of cocoa—on the house! That made Ricky a little happier. Again, she brought us the marshmallows on a separate plate. Before she left our booth, she winked at Ricky and said, “I’ve never kissed anyone beneath the mistletoe before.”

Ricky looked up as he dropped his marshmallow into his mug and he said, “And you ain’t kissing me again!”

She smiled her double dimples and went back to the counter and there, just over his cocoa mug, I could see he had a little bit of smile going, too.

Ed’s Corner

This is the time of year where we have the shortest daylight. It’s gray. It’s rainy. There’s not enough snow yet to make it feel brighter, prettier, seasonal. Some people experience a condition called SAD – Seasonal Affective Disorder – in the winter months, due to a lack of light. Special lamps are sold for people to sit under each day, which mimic the sun’s light. Reports lead me to believe they work!

This year, there are other reasons to be sad besides SAD. The news provides us with plenty of fodder to feel down, full of angst, stressed out, wondering what might be the truth…

But have hope! There is truth and tranquility to be be found when you are out in nature. And wherever you are, nature is not very far from you. Natural winter delights and verities are all around us:

* A beautiful snowstorm that transforms the sharp corners of the world
* If you tap trees, it’s time to get ready for maple sugaring
* By mid-January, you will feel – some days – a warmth in the air. The quality of the daylight will begin to feel different
* The sun rises in the morning and sets at night. This seems trivial but did you ever think about how it happens each and every day, without fail, and we can depend on it?
* How wonderful a fire feels and smells on a cold day

You can find your own truths out of doors. Forget the news for a while. It’s time for a nature break.

The Gingerbread House

Our cooking instructor, Eva Szigeti, suggests the healthy-risk-taking holiday activity of gingerbread house making from scratch, giving us building advice and a recipe.

The popularity of gingerbread has a long history. Research suggests that gingerbread houses originated in 16th century Germany, but they gained popularity later thanks to the Brothers Grimm fairy tale Hansel and Gretel, in which an evil witch lures two hungry children with a house made out of gingerbread.

The story of Hansel a Gretel has many interpretations and symbolic meanings; one of them being fear of hunger and the fear of being abandoned by loved ones, more specifically by parents. In the fairy tale version most likely found on the bookshelves of our children, Hansel and Gretel simply get lost in the dark forest. This is the edited, child-friendly version of the story adapted to our cultural sensibilities. In the original version from the collection of Brothers Grimm, the children are left in the forest by their parents intentionally. During a time of famine, the evil mother/stepmother chose self-preservation over the children.

Even young children know that at the end of the fairy tale, good will triumph over evil. In the cycle of the year and the seasons, light will triumph over darkness again. To fill the (literally) darkest days of the year with light, it seems appropriate to find ways to express gratitude for love, food, and everything that sustains us and gives meaning to our lives. One of my favorite ways to do this is by spending time in the kitchen with my children.

As we planned our pre-holiday baking projects, my daughter suggested that we make a gingerbread house. Although gingerbread cookies have always been on our holiday menu, we have never tried to make a gingerbread house.

First, I thought it was a good idea. But after considering all the work involved, the mess, and the relatively high probability of a baking disaster, I wasn’t so sure anymore.
Of course, my child insisted, and it seemed wrong to cause a disappointment just because I was not in the mood for a big project. Soon, both children were excited about the prospect of having a homemade gingerbread house, and they were ready to do their part. We decided not to take any short cuts and not to buy a gingerbread kit.

We looked up several instructions online. It seemed the most challenging issue was the structural one: how to make the bond between the walls strong that the house would not cave in. Some websites suggested that the only way to achieve a sturdy structure was to use crazy clue instead of icing. This, of course, would make the house inedible. I did not want to take that road. I like food to stay food, even when it takes on another form and function. Pairing gingerbread with glue seemed unfair to the yummy gingerbread. We had to figure out a way to make it work with icing. My son, who is interested in architecture and engineering, was responsible for the structural design.

My first suggestion was to make a simple chalet-style house. This would mean having only two triangle-shaped walls for the front and the back of the house, and two rectangle pieces for the roof, coming all the way down. No structural problems here. My son objected: “No one gets anywhere without taking a risk.” I had to reconsider. After all, trying to make a more elaborate house was a reasonable risk to take.

Using pieces of a construction set, my son built the skeleton of the house. This would later be placed inside of the gingerbread house to support the walls, and to prevent it from caving in. Then, based on the size of the prototype, we drew the pattern. Making the dough, cutting out the pieces, and baking, followed the next day.

This is a project requiring patience. There is no instant gratification here.  For us, it was reasonable to complete the house in the course of three days. A lot of planning and prep work was needed. At the same time, we had to be ready to give up the original plan in certain situations, to solve problems quickly, to be ready to troubleshoot and improvise, because things didn’t always go smoothly. On many levels, it was a great lesson for the children.

On the third day, it was time to put it all together and decorate. As for decoration, we opted for a simple solution free of artificial colors: white icing. While it was not easy to apply icing in a preplanned manner, icing did save the look of our house. Snow and icicles not only added a seasonal appearance to the house, they helped us to cover up the imperfections and mistakes. Thanks to icing, our first ever gingerbread house turned out just fine.

 

Gingerbread House Recipe

 
This recipe will make enough dough for a medium-sized gingerbread house. You should have enough leftover dough to bake some gingerbread cookies for the “builders”. You can design your own house or find a template online. Remember to bake a piece for a base to hold the house.
 
For the Dough:
2 sticks butter
1 cup sugar
1 ¼ cup molasses
3 eggs
7-8 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 ¼ teaspoons cinnamon
½ teaspoon allspice
1 teaspoon ground cloves
½ teaspoon ginger

Cream the butter and sugar. Add molasses and eggs. Mix until smooth.
Sift 5 cups of flour with the baking soda, salt, and spices. Gradually work into the egg mixture. Add 2-3 more cups of flour. Your dough should be heavy and stiff. Form into 4 balls, wrap in plastic wrap, and refrigerate overnight (or for at least 2 hours).

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Cover the baking sheets (you will need more than one) with parchment paper. Roll out a ball of dough to 1/8 inches thick. Place a paper pattern on the dough and, using a knife, cut out the shape. Gently put the shaped dough on the baking sheet.  Continue rolling and cutting until you have all the pieces needed for the house. Bake the pieces for 10-15 minutes.
Gently place the baked pieces on a cooling rack. Allow the gingerbread to cool.

 
For the Icing:
 3 cups confectioner’s sugar
2 egg whites

Beat the sugar and egg whites until thick and smooth.
Use a small round pastry tip for piping the icing. The parts of the house should be decorated before assembling. Allow the icing to harden. “Glass” windows can be made by “gluing” (with icing) a piece of wax paper over the window openings from the inside part of the walls.
Ideally, you should have a helper for the next step. To assemble the house, apply plenty of icing on the bottom of the front wall and on the bottom of one of the sidewalls, then on the inside angle of the walls. The walls need to be held in place until they dry. Repeat the process with the back wall and the other sidewall. You may need to wait several hours for the walls to dry fully before putting on the roof.
Use icing to cover mistakes or small openings between walls.